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APPLIED FOOD TECHNOLOGIES ACQUIRES ECOARRAY. March 2010.

Applied Food Technologies, Inc. announces it has acquired assets of EcoArray, Inc., including the name "EcoArray", logo, equipment, intellectual property, and marketing materials.

LeeAnn Applewhite, Applied Food Technologies' president, says, "The addition of EcoArray's technology and service business to AFT's current product line expands AFT's scope; enabling us to use microarray technology in both the food and environmental arenas." AFT will continue to operate EcoArray's laboratory services as a division of AFT.

Contact: LeeAnn Applewhite (386) 418-3661.

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ECOARRAY WINS HIGHLY COMPETITIVE EPA SBIR PHASE 1 GRANT. March 2008.

EcoArray was granted a Phase 1 SBIR grant by the EPA to continue research with microarrays in the field of NANOTECHNOLOGY. Over 400 grant applications were submitted, and after a two-tiered review, only 25 Phase 1 awards were funded. The overall goals of this Phase 1 grant are to employ microarrays to identify genes that fluctuate in fathead minnows after acute exposure to carbon nanotubes. The data will be analyzed to determine what, if any, pathways are affected in the fathead minnow. This information should enable us to identify “genetic fingerprints” and to use the database as a tool for identifying contaminants in unknown situations (class prediction), which may lead to an interpretation of human health issues. The research undertaken in the Phase 1 study of nanotubes should help validate the expediency and affordability of the high-density fathead minnow microarrays for compound screening and use in environmental toxicology. Our principal collaborator is Dr. Donald Tillitt, Branch Chief, U.S. Geological Survey, Columbia, MO, who will be overseeing the exposures.

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ECOARRAY MOVES INTO NEW FACILITY. March 2008.

It's official -- EcoArray has a new home in Suite 50, Interstate Office Park, Gainesville, FL. Since its inception in 2002, EcoArray had been located in the University of Florida's Sid Martin Biotechnology Development Incubator (BDI) in Alachua, FL. The BDI assists start-up companies by providing expert advice in science and business, common equipment, and reduced rates on laboratory space. However, after 5 years of successful managment, EcoArray was deemed ready to graduate from the BDI and moved out into fully commercial spaces. Company personnel were integral to the move, remodeling 1,200 sq. ft. of empty plain vanilla warehouse/office space into a multihued model of laboratory efficiency. The new offices and lab spaces are comfortable and fully functional. For photos of the new facility and our Open House on March 17th, click here.

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ECOARRAY AWARDED SECOND NIEHS PHASE 2 GRANT. August 2007.

EcoArray was granted a second Phase II SBIR grant by the NIEHS to continue research with microarrays in the field of environmental toxicology. One goal of this grant is to develop a high-density microarray (>5,000 genes) in sheepshead minnow (Cyprinodon variegatus), a fish model used for saltwater testing. In the Phase One application, we developed and tested small beta-arrays for sheepshead minnows and grass shrimp and we identified specific gene expression signatures for copper and pyrene in these animals when they were exposed to acute (short term) doses of these compounds. We plan to expand our studies of pyrene and copper by conducting longer term exposures so that we can link the gene signatures to a variety of phenotypic endpoints (FO generation fecundity/fertility, survival rate of F1 generation fry and histopathological endpoints). In addition, we will conduct short-term exposures in sheepshead minnows using two additional compounds, cadmium and bisphenol A. These compounds were chosen because their diverse modes of action will provide a robust validation for the arrays and because they are present in many coastal superfund sites. The gene expression data obtained from these studies will be incorporated into a relational database along with other parameters including water chemistry data and physiological and reproductive endpoints. In addition, we will also conduct several case studies in the field at a site that is know to contain copper and pyrene in order to demonstrate the utility of using these microarrays in the field. This grant provides $750,000 over 2 years.

The Principal Investigator for this project is Barbara J. Carter, Director, Research and Development at EcoArray. The principal collaborator is Dr. Marius Brouwer, Gulf Coast Research Laboratory, University of Southern Mississippi.

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LOW DENSITY MICROARRAYS TO BE PHASED OUT. March 2007.

EcoArray will be replacing our low desnity microarrays with high-density formats this summer. This change parallels the course that Agilent Technologies has announced: that it will cease printing the low density microarrays (e.g., the 2 x 11K feature and 1 x 22K feature formats) by the summer of 2007. The fathead minnow microarray will be available in two high-density formats. The FHM 4-pack (4 arrays on one glass slide) will offer approximately 22,000 genes. The new FHM 8-pack (8 arrays on one glass slide) will be reduced to the most well-annotated 15,000 genes and will cost less than $100 per array for academics.

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ECOARRAY OFFERS 22,000 FEATURE FATHEAD MINNOW MICROARRAY. August 2006.

After months of research and verification, EcoArray released its 22,000 feature fathead minnow microarray for environmental toxicology testing. The array has over 21,000 fully-annotated genes; 100% of these genes have been matched (e-value < E-04) to named genes in the published databases. During our research and development of this array, we discovered that multiple probes designed for a specific gene do not respond equally. Therefore, EcoArray decided to spot only the best probe per gene, one array per glass slide (22K format). This serves the dual purposes of providing broad genome coverage while keeping the cost lower than for a 44K array. The genes are part of a wide variety of biological pathways and processes including: reproduction, cell communication, metabolism, homeostasis, and others.

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